Jasmine Loake - Digital Practices
Sharpness in the Shadows (footnote five)
This final image really engages me as I feel it was the main image in my collection of photographs that conveyed something different to the rest. As this was my first real investigation into using the overhead projector, I decided that I would use new and interesting shapes that could project onto the wall, along with the light. I decided to do this test in the corner of the project space, as I wanted to see how the light and shadows would distort around the space, and to my surprise, I don’t think it made that much difference to the overall image. However, I do feel as though it was a great initial point I could work from in order to undertake future experiments in which I could focus on uneven and broken up surroundings to project upon.

The circular shape where the light of the projector is, is one of my favourite aspects of this photograph, as it almost puts the jagged shape into a spotlight, so the audiences’ focus isn’t able to be drawn to other areas of the image, but it almost guides eyes towards the center which I find interesting. Maybe if I had lit up the surrounding area, it wouldn’t have been as effective? This is definitely something I want to use as my root, and I’m really happy that I can use this image as a final footnote as its a brilliant representation of the progression in my work, and how much it’s changed since the ideas contained within my first.

Sharpness in the Shadows (footnote five)

This final image really engages me as I feel it was the main image in my collection of photographs that conveyed something different to the rest. As this was my first real investigation into using the overhead projector, I decided that I would use new and interesting shapes that could project onto the wall, along with the light. I decided to do this test in the corner of the project space, as I wanted to see how the light and shadows would distort around the space, and to my surprise, I don’t think it made that much difference to the overall image. However, I do feel as though it was a great initial point I could work from in order to undertake future experiments in which I could focus on uneven and broken up surroundings to project upon.

The circular shape where the light of the projector is, is one of my favourite aspects of this photograph, as it almost puts the jagged shape into a spotlight, so the audiences’ focus isn’t able to be drawn to other areas of the image, but it almost guides eyes towards the center which I find interesting. Maybe if I had lit up the surrounding area, it wouldn’t have been as effective? This is definitely something I want to use as my root, and I’m really happy that I can use this image as a final footnote as its a brilliant representation of the progression in my work, and how much it’s changed since the ideas contained within my first.

Changing the Mood of a Space (footnote four)
The mood and atmosphere can be changed significantly with light which is something I discovered when creating this piece. Many of my pieces up until this point had been quite light and colourful, however, I found this one to contrast the norm in my work and was actually quite dark and the bands of slight that stretched across the images were sharp and definite rather than the ghostly shapes I’d been producing before.
I found this small experiment really helpful and something specific in the image I’d like to point out is the bottom band of light in which it begins to break up. This was interesting to me as this effect hadn’t appeared on any other part of this experiment, and it almost linked back the broken up, ghostly images in my work beforehand which I liked.

Finally, this was a piece that peers extracted from my blog to talk about during group presentations in which we spoke about each others work to the other students. They commented on the difference between this image, which was said to be fairly ‘creepy’ to the other ones which made them feel at ease. I like the idea that there’s something unsettling in this work and I believe it to be something that really opened by eyes to how important peer feedback can it. I think these ideas are something I’d like to tease out for experiments and investigations in future practices.

Changing the Mood of a Space (footnote four)

The mood and atmosphere can be changed significantly with light which is something I discovered when creating this piece. Many of my pieces up until this point had been quite light and colourful, however, I found this one to contrast the norm in my work and was actually quite dark and the bands of slight that stretched across the images were sharp and definite rather than the ghostly shapes I’d been producing before.

I found this small experiment really helpful and something specific in the image I’d like to point out is the bottom band of light in which it begins to break up. This was interesting to me as this effect hadn’t appeared on any other part of this experiment, and it almost linked back the broken up, ghostly images in my work beforehand which I liked.

Finally, this was a piece that peers extracted from my blog to talk about during group presentations in which we spoke about each others work to the other students. They commented on the difference between this image, which was said to be fairly ‘creepy’ to the other ones which made them feel at ease. I like the idea that there’s something unsettling in this work and I believe it to be something that really opened by eyes to how important peer feedback can it. I think these ideas are something I’d like to tease out for experiments and investigations in future practices.

Bands of Colour (footnote three)
This ghostly image was really important to me in showing the development of my investigations. After my artist research, I began to experiment with coloured sheets in combination with the barn-door lamp, and the sides of the lamp created this curious effect in which it broke apart the light and colour, almost creating bands or barriers to separate them.
Specifically, the reason that I decided to chose this image was because it wasn’t something I discovered through planning, but instead have actually now come to understand that a lot of my work comes from the experimentation and unplanned ideas rather than going into an experiment knowing exactly what I’m going to do. Going into an experiment with clear ideas in my head can sometimes prevent me from allowing myself to let the work expand, and I feel as though this experiment in particular allowed me to see that, which I think has been a vital part of my learning this semester.

Again, I also find this image important because I came out of this experiment with more courage than I’d previously had, and it was the one that encouraged me to leap out of my comfort zone and to use the overhead projector which was something I’d never previously used and had been putting off. In particular, I felt that the use of the coloured sheets could work really well with the overhead projector which is what gave me the initial motivation and I feel as though this image is so crucial because it was the positive starting point and root to a lot of my later work.

Bands of Colour (footnote three)

This ghostly image was really important to me in showing the development of my investigations. After my artist research, I began to experiment with coloured sheets in combination with the barn-door lamp, and the sides of the lamp created this curious effect in which it broke apart the light and colour, almost creating bands or barriers to separate them.

Specifically, the reason that I decided to chose this image was because it wasn’t something I discovered through planning, but instead have actually now come to understand that a lot of my work comes from the experimentation and unplanned ideas rather than going into an experiment knowing exactly what I’m going to do. Going into an experiment with clear ideas in my head can sometimes prevent me from allowing myself to let the work expand, and I feel as though this experiment in particular allowed me to see that, which I think has been a vital part of my learning this semester.

Again, I also find this image important because I came out of this experiment with more courage than I’d previously had, and it was the one that encouraged me to leap out of my comfort zone and to use the overhead projector which was something I’d never previously used and had been putting off. In particular, I felt that the use of the coloured sheets could work really well with the overhead projector which is what gave me the initial motivation and I feel as though this image is so crucial because it was the positive starting point and root to a lot of my later work.

Inspiration (footnote two)
The work of James Turrell is something that really helped me to develop my work, and was a key turning point for me in my experimentation. His work is so bold and bright it was really quite a contrast between my images in which I’d been looking into the subtle areas of light that interested me once projected onto the wall. Working mainly in black and white, I’d found my work to become quite repetitive and I learned there was only so much I could do with the small barn-door lamp: this piece of art by James Turrell is what really interested me and encouraged me to begin to work with solid shapes obstructing the light’s path and creating new effects on the projection space such as colour.

The harsh, white triangular shape in the centre of the image was intriguing, and something that I picked up on was not the shape it’s self, but was the reflection of the light that seemed to break down the contrast between the white and green. Another reason I feel I connected with this image was due to the space in which the piece is installed – it seemed to be similar to the space in which I was working in which made me realise that the studios has so much potential and that I could not only use the project space more effectively, but I could use different areas in the studios, all of which could give my work a totally different meaning.

Inspiration (footnote two)

The work of James Turrell is something that really helped me to develop my work, and was a key turning point for me in my experimentation. His work is so bold and bright it was really quite a contrast between my images in which I’d been looking into the subtle areas of light that interested me once projected onto the wall. Working mainly in black and white, I’d found my work to become quite repetitive and I learned there was only so much I could do with the small barn-door lamp: this piece of art by James Turrell is what really interested me and encouraged me to begin to work with solid shapes obstructing the light’s path and creating new effects on the projection space such as colour.

The harsh, white triangular shape in the centre of the image was intriguing, and something that I picked up on was not the shape it’s self, but was the reflection of the light that seemed to break down the contrast between the white and green. Another reason I feel I connected with this image was due to the space in which the piece is installed – it seemed to be similar to the space in which I was working in which made me realise that the studios has so much potential and that I could not only use the project space more effectively, but I could use different areas in the studios, all of which could give my work a totally different meaning.

Subtlety (Footnote One)
This was my first successful capture of light after my previous experiments. What specifically drew me back to the image was the peculiar ‘fishbone’ shape that projected onto the wall. After being shown how to use the barn-door lamp, I began to experiment with the ways in which the light source and the surroundings could interact. I found that I became interested in looking into the subtlety of the light, and chose small sections of what I could see which were unusual and which would normally go unnoticed.
These interested me because it was something so unusual and curious; it made me want to continue to experiment different ways in which I could alter the way in which the light was projected onto the wall. I really feel that this experiment helped me to forward my developments by giving me that initial interesting in something I’d discovered, allowing me to continue this idea.
I chose this image because it was what I felt to be my first experiment that I really engaged with and which I was able to feel connected with as it was something interesting and unique. Previously, my work hadn’t been very effective and this was because I hadn’t experimented with any light sources other than a torch. I feel as though this was the key turning point in my work, and I began to see that I really needed to look into and experiment with a variety of light sources rather than things that I was comfortable using. It was a case of pushing myself out my comfort zone, and I think that my work is definitely better for it.

Subtlety (Footnote One)

This was my first successful capture of light after my previous experiments. What specifically drew me back to the image was the peculiar ‘fishbone’ shape that projected onto the wall. After being shown how to use the barn-door lamp, I began to experiment with the ways in which the light source and the surroundings could interact. I found that I became interested in looking into the subtlety of the light, and chose small sections of what I could see which were unusual and which would normally go unnoticed.

These interested me because it was something so unusual and curious; it made me want to continue to experiment different ways in which I could alter the way in which the light was projected onto the wall. I really feel that this experiment helped me to forward my developments by giving me that initial interesting in something I’d discovered, allowing me to continue this idea.

I chose this image because it was what I felt to be my first experiment that I really engaged with and which I was able to feel connected with as it was something interesting and unique. Previously, my work hadn’t been very effective and this was because I hadn’t experimented with any light sources other than a torch. I feel as though this was the key turning point in my work, and I began to see that I really needed to look into and experiment with a variety of light sources rather than things that I was comfortable using. It was a case of pushing myself out my comfort zone, and I think that my work is definitely better for it.

Group Presentations - 01/05/2014

In today’s session, we were asked to get into small groups and look at each others’ recent work on the blogs. The task was to comment on things that engaged us about the other person’s blog as well as thinking of a question you’d like to ask about their work.

What I got out of it:
I got quite a lot out of the lecture today, as my peers came up with things which I hadn’t given much thought to. For example, the question I was asked was ‘what inspired you to move forward with light?’ And this is something I hadn’t really given much thought behind. However, I realised that after a tutorial of being shown how to use the projector as well as research into James Turrell’s work, I understood that these are both key things to draw inspiration from. I explained that the reason I chose light because it was almost like an ‘impossible’ surface which I thought would be an interesting challenge to push me straight out my comfort zone. Light’s something that couldn’t be felt, and wasn’t physically there, but it still hit surfaces which changed them with shadows and highlighting areas.

The areas that my peers picked up on was this specific image (above), and how unusually, you’re able to see the entire spectrum of colours from the refracted light which comes from the projector.
Another things they expressed interest in was the way in which each image I’d posted gave the room a different feeling or atmosphere which I found interesting and hadn’t thought about in much detail. They explained that the use of pattern in colours on the image about looked nice and was pleasant to look at, but some of them made the room feel quite small and tense down to the sharp shapes and large amount of darkness.

Where I plan to go next:

These things, I found were so interesting, and I feel as though I can really move forward with the ideas of changing the atmosphere of the room by using my acetate and drawings on the projector. Maybe I could begin to make two different things, one being a black shape in a white room, and the other being a small white shape in a completely dark room and see what kind of effect it has.

Experimentation:

After my tutorial, I began to look into doing something new with the projectors and lights over the Easter Break. This is acrylic on plastic wallets. I wanted to create shapes with paint and see how, when put on a projector, would react to the surroundings. After feedback I received in the group assessments I need to experiment my ideas somewhere other than the wall of the project space. I’m thinking about putting these patterns and textures onto the floor / roof of other rooms.Unfortunately, I’ve not had chance to use the projector yet, but will be going in to experiment tomorrow, and will be evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the ideas.

I’ve also done pieces similar to this in which I’ve drawn onto, which is what I’ll be uploading and talking about next next.

Group Assessment

What I’ve learnt and what I need to do now:

After today’s group assessment, I can see that I need to start linking back artists’ work with my own, drawing inspiration from them and clearly documenting it with my research and ideas. I also need to look into doing these experiments in different spaces with new and different materials.

How I’m developing my work:

I’m going to develop thing with continued experiments, and my acetate images and new installations and videos of the process.
I’ve been looking into the work of James Turrell, and want to begin looking deeper into him, making connections with my own work instead of just putting the research onto my blog.

I’m really pleased I had the chance to be assessed by my peers, as it was easy to talk through and discuss with them what needed doing and what was going well and I feel as though getting reviewed by both peers, and lecturers is that I’ve received different feedback, giving me more of an idea with what I need to do.

Personal Reflection So Far:

So far in this aspect I feel as though my work has really developed into something that’s both fun and curious to work with. I find myself constantly looking at light sources, scanning my surroundings for possible effects it has on the varieties of shapes within the environments.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

I feel as though my main strength throughout has been my eye for subtlety, and finding things that are normally overlooked or unnoticed. For example, in my first set of images using the barn door light, there are small fishbone shapes on the side of the wall. 
However, I think that I was struggling to create something different each time and felt as though I was beginning to repeat myself, which is why I began to look into different areas. I’m going to begin looking into some more artists and how they’ve used light.

How has my Idea has changed and developed?

My initial thought was to create a piece of performance using shadows (looking at the Surfaces aspect), and I wasn’t sure how to go about doing it. However, after tutorials and group crits, I stopped thinking about the performance and just began to experiment with a variety of light (Still thinking about surfaces), some of which worked, and others didn’t.

I’m now creating small installations each week, capturing images and documenting them onto my blog. As previously stated, my next experiment will consist of acetate which has been drawn onto and have patterns of ink that will shine through and onto the surfaces.

'Hunters in the Snow' - Grey Discription

In the top left of the piece, you’re able to see delicate, yet spiny, overlapping branches of the trees in front of a mottled jade green sky. Contrasting this, slightly further down are some sturdy buildings gently coated in a layer of pure white snow. A sign attatched to the building is suspended unevenly, looking as though, at any second, it could drop into the flames of a burning open fire. The blazing colours of the crowded fire seem to pierce through the white, giving a warm feeling amongst the harsh, cold colours of the wintery scene.


Moving down, the stooped, weary hounds are trudging through the mass of white, leaving snowy footprints behind and in between intertwining trees as they return from their hunt. The men too, hunched and drooping, accompanying and leading the hounds over the bank into the bleak little village beneath.


The birds perched on the branches are silhouetted in the top center of the art, overlooking the blacksmith’s fire and the crowds of people in the distance. A third silhouetted bird is elegantly gliding through the sky, soaring whilst it beholds the beautiful snow-capped mountains which tear through the sky in jagged, triangular forms. The magnificent landscape abraft the reserved village consists of more lifeless trees and mountains that soften as they disappear into the distance.


Below the bank where the hunters are headed, past the wild, thorny bush, there are two high-roofed homes veiled by the softer, less detailed trees which hide them from the surroundings in a blur of business in combination with the ocean of snow. A small viaduct bridge arches across the icy environment allowing a shadowy pedestrian to cross to his destination.

image

Lecture Notes (03/04/14)

-          Write a 'grey description'

-          Start in the top left of image

-          Be lead by the image (birds, trees)

-          Birds, soaring, sticks out, perched, mid-flight

-          Lots of people, look into distance, Proxemics, status.

-          Be descriptive, look at gesture

-          Key words – cross, stoop, gesture, weary, gliding, elegant,                         mountains, silhouetted, jade coloured sky.

-          Fire contrasting with the cold colours of the background.

-          Shapes of trees, like streetlamps.

-          Look into Solaris

Micro Experiment Four:

This is something that although was interesting to play with, I don’t think I’d want to continue it further. These images are the result of the light sources in the shed - the small slits in the walls worked really well, and when I moved the camera around, blurred the image making it look ghostly and unique from everything else I’ve done. What I do like about these images, is how you can make out certain bits from outside the shed, such as a win-mirror and body or a red car.

I want to carry on making installations in the project space, exploring different ways of using and distorting the light. I want to explore the shapes that the light makes, looking for the things that are subtle, but still there, and visible.
My next experiment is going to be using acetate as previously mentioned, using ink, paint, and drawings to project into the space.

Micro Experiment Three:

This is my second set of images using the overhead projector. I feel as though when they’re put together, they work as a team, and think that showing images or installations in numbers is a good idea. However, I don’t feel as though this set of images was as successful as the last, because I feel as though I’ve tried too hard to recreate this subtlety, but I suppose that they work in their own way. However, I’m glad I’ve done another experiment as I feel as though I’ve learnt from it and have gained a created understanding of what works well, and what I would consider using as a working piece.

Experiment Three:

After a tutorial, it was decided that I now start to explore new light sources instead of using solely the barn door light. I began to use the overhead projector, and combined it with the barn door light.

After realising that in my previous light images I had an eye for the subtlety, I began to experiment further using materials and other lights to create some new images in the project space - this was the result.

I feel as though this second set of images were successful, as I believe that the colours and the shapes within the images all work well together, and that as a group, they’re effective in showing the ways in which the light behaves, which is what I was exploring!

Next, I want to look in to using acetate which I’ve poured ink (and other materials) onto and see what kind of effect that has on the surroundings when used with the overhead projector.

Artist Research - James Turrell:

Again, this is some more work of James Turrell, and I think it’s absolutely beautiful. To be surrounded by such abnormal colours, without being able to clearly see where the walls and entrances/exits are is so strange.

I can imagine that being in a coloured room being unable to see the way out could be quite claustrophobic. The pieces with the triangular shapes and cubes are my favourites as it really gives a sense of a 3D presence, and it’s something that would be unexpected and out of place.

I’m really keen to find more artists that play with light in this way, as I finally think this is something I could experiment with and move forward!